The Basics Of Ikebana

Hello everyone! Today, we have Caroline from FTD, sharing a bit about the ancient art of ikebana! 

Flowers have a way of brightening up a space. And each flower is so intricate that it hardly needs a full bouquet to bring out its beauty. Often, minimalist arrangements are the best way to showcase the beauty of individual flowers. One method of minimalist arranging, ikebana, uses flowers to create and preserve space. Creating an ikebana arrangement is supposed to have a meditative quality, as the designer reflects on the beauty of nature and gains inner peace.

This art form originated in Japan, and the arrangements were originally used as offerings in Buddhist temples. Since then, ikebana has become more secular and evolved into over 3000 schools. One of the most popular, Moribana, was influenced by Western blooms and is less structured than other styles. There are three common Moribana styles: upright, slanting, and water-reflecting. Beginner’s typically start by learning the upright style.

IKEBANA BASICS- clikc through for a basic run through on this Japanese form of flower arranging via www.surelysimple.com

In Moribana, flowers are arranged in shallow containers called utsuwa. Floral frogs are used to help the branches be placed in upright or angled positions. There are three main types of flowers and branches used in these arrangements. The longest branch, called shin, represents heaven. The medium branch, soe, represents man. And the shortest branch, tai, represents earth.

Some qualities of an ikebana arrangement:

IKEBANA BASICS- clikc through for a basic run through on this Japanese form of flower arranging via www.surelysimple.com

Each branch and flower is measured in relation to the utsuwa, as you can see in this visual:

IKEBANA BASICS- clikc through for a basic run through on this Japanese form of flower arranging via www.surelysimple.com
In an upright Moribana arrangement, the shin, soe, and tai must be placed at certain angles, taking advantage of three dimensional space in every direction.

IKEBANA BASICS- clikc through for a basic run through on this Japanese form of flower arranging via www.surelysimple.com

Typically shin flowers and branches are structured so they can stand upright. Soe flowers and branches are moderately structured, and tai flowers are the least structured. When you create your arrangement, remember to utilize the power of space and that sometimes less is more!

Here are some different styles:

IKEBANA BASICS- clikc through for a basic run through on this Japanese form of flower arranging via www.surelysimple.com

Let’s talk about flowers which can be used for ikebana:

IKEBANA BASICS- clikc through for a basic run through on this Japanese form of flower arranging via www.surelysimple.comThanks Caroline and the FTD team for such an informative guide! Visit their website here– and find flowers, guides and more!